970 McHenry Avenue, Crystal Lake, IL 60014
Search
Botto Gilbert Lancaster, PC

Call Today for Your FREE Consultation

Call Us800-338-3833 | 815-338-3838

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn
Recent blog posts

What Employees Should Know

A.  Introduction

On March 27, 2020, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”), was passed by Congress and signed into law. 

The CARES Act is the largest economic bill in U.S. History, calling for nearly $2 trillion in spending, in part as an economic stimulus package to benefit small businesses and individuals.

...

How Do You Find Hidden Assets in a Divorce?Negotiating the division of property in a divorce begins with identifying the properties that you and your spouse own. Marital properties are the ones that you will equitably divide between each other. Non-marital or separate properties belong to only one of you, though knowing their value is relevant when deciding on financial matters in your divorce. You and your divorce attorney will at times need to cooperate with your spouse to obtain records on your marital and separate assets. However, spouses sometimes hide valuable assets during divorce so that they do not have to share them or to make it appear that they have fewer financial resources. Hidden assets can skew the financial balance of your divorce agreement, and you need to work with your attorney if you believe that your spouse may have hidden assets.

What Are You Looking For?

Hidden assets can be secret financial accounts or luxury items that your spouse is holding in a place that you are not aware of. A spouse can more easily hide assets when they own a business or are the only one who manages their marital finances. If you are unsure whether your spouse has hidden assets, you can start by obtaining copies of their income tax returns or loan applications. In those documents, you are looking for:

  • Unidentified assets
  • Unexplained transactions
  • Discrepancies between the income they told you and the income they reported

If your attorney finds suspicious information, they may trace it to a separate bank account or discover that the assets were temporarily transferred to another person.

...

Does Not Wearing a Safety Belt Hurt Your Personal Injury Lawsuit?Buckling up while in a car is not only the law but potentially a life-saving practice. According to the National Highway Travel Safety Administration, 47 percent of the people who died in vehicle crashes in 2017 were not wearing a safety belt. Not wearing a safety belt or wearing it improperly puts you at risk of being thrown out of the vehicle during a crash or hitting your head inside the vehicle. In Illinois, all drivers and passengers age 8 and older are required to wear a safety belt, with a violation being a $25 fine. There is a separate car seat requirement for passengers younger than 8. Can you file a personal injury lawsuit if you were injured in an accident while not wearing a safety belt? Illinois law does not allow a defendant in a personal injury lawsuit to use the plaintiff’s lack of a safety belt as evidence that the plaintiff was negligent.

Seatbelt Defense

Illinois uses comparative fault to determine how much compensation a plaintiff will receive in a personal injury lawsuit. If the plaintiff was liable in part for the accident, their award in a lawsuit will be reduced. The percentage they receive from the award they request in the lawsuit will be equal to the percentage of fault that the defendant shared for the accident. If the plaintiff is more than 50 percent at fault, they will receive nothing.

In some states, the defendant in a personal injury case is allowed to argue that the plaintiff’s negligence in not wearing a safety belt was partially responsible for their injuries. However, Illinois is one of the states that does not allow the “seatbelt defense.” Illinois’ law requiring safety belts includes a section stating that a violation of the law is not evidence of negligence and cannot limit someone’s ability to receive:

...

Crystal Lake Criminal Defense LawyerOn March 27, 2020, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”), was passed by Congress and signed into law. 

The CARES Act is the largest economic bill in U.S. History, calling for nearly $2 trillion in spending, in part as an economic stimulus package to benefit small businesses and individuals.

Leaving aside provisions within the CARES to assist businesses, while the unemployment assistance program has been a prominent feature in the landscape of various coronavirus relief programs, there are a number of other such programs that may offer financial assistance for individuals, including:

...

Posted on in BGL Law

By: Brian K. Stevens

McHenry County Criminal Defense Lawyer“But I was never read my rights!”

I probably hear this statement from at least one out of every three clients when they first come into my office.  And rightly so.  TV and movies often portray (incorrectly) situations where a suspect is not read their “rights” – and the next scene, after the commercial break, they are being released from jail with their charges dismissed. Let’s explore the issue of those “rights” in this article.

...
Illinois State Bar Association State Bar of Wisconsin Crystal Lake Chamber of Commerce Illinois Trial Lawyers Association McHenry County Bar Association
Back to Top